A Message from the Music Minister

A Message From the Music Minister

We are entering into an exciting time of the church season, and one that involves a lot of music. I am so excited that we’ve had two additional singers join the choir…Christina and Carolyn! Please be sure to thank them for sharing their voices with all of us during our fellowship time or after the service. I’m hoping we might have a few extra singers join as well, even if it’s just for the month of December. This is a heavy music month with special songs for Advent, and for the Christmas Eve service…so if you’d like to get a taste for what it’s like singing in the choir at Central this would be the month to try it!

I thought we’d take a month off from spotlighting or singers, and instead wanted to share this article our new pianist/organist, Kim, shared with all of us. It was featured on NPR and talks about some of the great benefits of singing together! It’s written by British composer, artist and activist Brian Eno.

Thanks for reading, and as always, feel free to stop by the choir room 9:30am Sunday morning!

All the best,

Mark

“I believe in singing. I believe in singing together.

I believe that singing is the key to long life, a stable temperament, increased intelligence, new friends, super self-confidence, and a better sense of humor. A recent long-term study conducted in Scandinavia sought to discover which activities related to a healthy and happy later life. Three stood out: camping, dancing and singing.

Well, there are physiological benefits: You use your lungs in a way that you probably don’t for the rest of your day, breathing deeply and openly. And there are psychological benefits, too: Singing aloud leaves you with a sense of levity and contentedness. And then there are what I would call “civilizational benefits.” When you sing with a group of people, you learn how to subsume yourself into a group consciousness because singing is all about the immersion of the self into the community. That’s one of the great feelings — to stop being me for a little while and to become us. That way lies empathy, the great social virtue.

Well, there are physiological benefits: You use your lungs in a way that you probably don’t for the rest of your day, breathing deeply and openly. And there are psychological benefits, too: Singing aloud leaves you with a sense of levity and contentedness. And then there are what I would call “civilizational benefits.” When you sing with a group of people, you learn how to subsume yourself into a group consciousness because singing is all about the immersion of the self into the community. That’s one of the great feelings — to stop being me for a little while and to become us. That way lies empathy, the great social virtue.

I believe singing builds character and, more than anything else, encourages a taste for co-operation with others. This seems to be about the most important thing in today’s world.”